Infant/Toddler Education

Baby Talk: Resources to support the people who work with infants and toddlers Issue No. 9 February 2012

 

   

 Importance of Physical Play for Motor Development

Jeffrey Trawick-Smith’s annotated bibliography of evidence for the benefits of play is organized by age group. Visit From Playpen to Playground—The Importance of Physical Play for the Motor Development of Young Children and you can access evidence on 1) infant/toddler play and physical development/brain growth, 2) infant/toddler play and cognition, perception and language, or 3) infant/toddler play and social-emotional development. This resource was developed for the National Center for Physical Development and Outdoor Play.

 Help Toddlers Develop Fine Motor Skills

Help toddlers to develop crucial fine motor skills with the activities suggested in this sequence of web pages from Baby Center. There is a lot of information on how to develop fine and gross motor skills, with emphasis on children who are right- or left-handed.

 Motor Development for Toddlers

Toddlers acquire motor skills in a predictable sequence: First they walk, then run and climb, then jump with both feet, for example. But while the sequence may be consistent, the rate at which individual children develop varies enormously. And when a toddler seems to be late on a particular milestone, such as walking, it can be difficult to tell whether the problem is just an individual quirk or a true motor development problem. This article helps make distinctions between qualitative and quantitative differences, and highlights ten red flags that may signal an early motor development problem.

 

 Baby Talk is a free, one-way listserv that is distributed monthly. Each issue features one or more resources, the majority of which are available to download at no cost. To join the listserv, send an email with no message to subscribe-babytalk@listserv.unc.edu. For additional information (or to offer suggestions), please contact Camille Catlett at camille.catlett@unc.edu or (919) 966-6635.

 

 

 

Baby Talk: Resources to support the people who work with infants and toddlers

 

Baby Talk: Resources to support the people who work with infants and toddlers

 

Issue No. 8  January 16, 2012

 

Selecting Toys that Support Infant and Toddler Learning and Development

Interested in how infant and toddler caregivers can create healthy attachments to the children in their settings? Using Toys to Support Infant-Toddler Learning and Development by Gabriel Guyton is an article that highlights ways in which teachers who are knowledgeable about child development and play can intentionally select toys that meet young children’s unique needs and interests and support learning.

 

Reinforced Recommendation: No Screen Time for Kids Under 2

When the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently updated their guidelines, the organization reaffirmed its 1999 recommendation that discouraged television viewing by children under age 2. The AAP’s newest policy statement on the topic, “Media Use by Children Younger Than Two Years,” comes on the scene at a time when children’s screen options have expanded to include other forms of electronic media, such as computers, video games, tablets, and smart phones. The group once again calls for parents to limit screen time for children under age 2, pointing to additional research showing the negative effects of too much time spent with electronic media at young ages, particularly the sacrifice of time spent engaging in creative play and interacting with people and objects.

 

Despite the AAP’s guidelines, the results of a new survey from Common Sense Media show that electronic media are prevalent in the lives of children from birth to age 8. More than a quarter of all screen time is spent with newer digital media, including computers, video games, smart phones, and tablets, with half of all children having access to one of these devices. More specifically, apps on newer mobile devices are increasingly popular, and have been used by 10% of infants up to 1-year old, 39% of 2- to 4-year-olds, and 52% of 5- to 8-year-olds.

 

Baby Talk is a free, one-way listserv that is distributed monthly. Each issue features one or more resources, the majority of which are available to download at no cost. To join the listserve, send an email with no message to subscribe-babytalk@listserv.unc.edu. For additional information (or to offer suggestions), please contact Camille Catlett at camille.catlett@unc.eduor (919) 966-6635.

Example of Parent & Caregiver Engagement Cards

Long time CITE member, Mary Lou Allen, initiated these ‘Building Brains from Birth to 36 Months of Life’  parent & caregiver engagement cards!
Learn more »

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